Article Of Faith

Hillary Clinton is either a moron or a liar.

While delivering a speech before the National Council for Behavioral Health Conference in Oxon Hill, MD yesterday, Miss “What Difference Does It Make” said the following:

“I think again we’re way out of balance. I think that we’ve got to rein in what has become an almost article of faith that anybody can have a gun anywhere, anytime. And I don’t believe that is in the best interest of the vast majority of people. And I think you can say that and still support the right of people to own guns.”

Anybody? Anywhere? Anytime? Oh, dear. Let’s have a talk.

Nobody is suggesting that just anyone should be allowed to have a gun. It is currently illegal for a convicted felon (or someone convicted of a misdemeanor involving violence) to purchase or possess a firearm. I have never disputed the fact that they should not be allowed to have guns, nor has the NRA. Second Amendment supporters believe that law is perfectly sound.

Anywhere? Well, we believe we should be allowed to carry our lawfully-owned guns to a lot of places that we’re not allowed to, but we still obey the law. We have always believed that gun-free zones are little more than massive targets for bad guys. Exactly one shooting that has taken place in the past two decades took place in an area that was NOT a gun-free zone, and the shooter was stopped by the very item that liberals like Clinton say should be banned: a high-capacity magazine (it jammed, something that well-trained gun owners know is always a problem). Yes, we should be allowed to carry our guns when we take our kids to school. Yes, we should be allowed to carry our guns to church. However, the law also says that if any establishment does not want its patrons bringing their steel, they can put up a sign and we have to leave them in the car.

Anytime? I think that was answered by my response to the “anywhere” remark.

Nobody is suggesting that guns be that easy to obtain. None of us ever have. What we’re saying is that you’re proposing too many rules, too many laws, and too many limits on our very clear freedoms. Most of the rules you’re trying to write into law are already in the law. You just don’t feel right unless you get a law passed after a tragedy.

My faith is that you actually, deep down, want what’s best for this country – even though you have a piss-poor way of showing it, Mrs. Clinton.

(Side note: can anyone tell me why Clinton was the one speaking at a conference on mental health? As I recall, her education is in legal matters. Unless they decided that her eight years in the White House dealing with Bill’s crap made her fully qualified, I really don’t understand why someone thought Hillary was the best choice for this summit.)

Well, Blow Me Over…

Madonna just made me fall out of my chair.

Following the news that has-been Jim Carrey made the very public decision to stop backing his latest film, Kick-Ass 2, superstar Madonna managed something I didn’t think she could: she shocked the hell out of every conservative in America.

She has gone public with her belief that it’s PEOPLE that kill people – not guns.

Carrey Tweeted, “I did Kickass a month b4 Sandy Hook and now in all good conscience I cannot support that level of violence…I’m not ashamed of it but recent events have caused a change in my heart.” So, the shootings at Paducah, Jonesboro, Columbine, Red Lake, Amish Country, Virginia Tech, and Tucson didn’t change your heart before Sandy Hook? It took multiple mass shootings (nearly all in gun-free zones, something you’d think would indicate a trend) before you opened your eyes? That smacks of either willful ignorance or blatant opportunism, I can’t decide which. Besides being openly insulting with his “Cold Dead Hands” schtick (again, I point out the trend that this supposedly brilliant man can’t find right under his nose), now he expects that we’re gullible enough to buy his mea culpa routine? Please.

Don’t count on him giving his salary back to the production studio that made Kick-Ass 2. He won’t do any pressers to promote the film, but you can bet your sweet bippie he got paid for his time.

Carrey’s self-righteous grandstanding doesn’t really surprise me anymore. Madonna, on the other hand, was completely unexpected in her support of Second Amendment rights and the logic behind what we believe. She’s right. A gun isn’t going to sprout legs, walk down the street and kill someone. It doesn’t tell the person who picks it up to drive to the local school and start shooting people. A person – a human being with full control of their own choices and movement – has to make the decision to get the gun, load it, transport it, find their victims and kill them. That takes time, thought, and effort. Often they have to consider whether they’re willing to be taken into custody or if they’d rather kill themselves. A lot goes into these mass events that most liberals don’t stop to think about.

Madonna apparently has a better head on her shoulders than I first thought. I still don’t like her music, but I can certainly give her more credit for being able to think independently and not move with the Hollywood herd.

She is sure to catch flak for this. Carrey is taking some from one of the film’s producers, but that will be where it ends. His career has hit the skids; his most recent roles have been reduced to support (whereas he was once a commanding presence as a leading actor), and the slam-dunk of a sequel to one of his biggest hits, “Dumb and Dumber”, has been cancelled. He has several other films in the works but he is no longer the box office draw that he was.

The hysterical thing about this whole situation? The character he plays, Colonel Stars and Stripes, is a Christian who refuses to fire a gun.

I think I’m gonna go see it on opening day.

It Just Can’t Happen Again

Somewhere between 400,000 and 600,000 marched for life in Washington, DC on Friday, January 25. There wasn’t much said in the media – in fact, the last time one of the MSM shills interviewed someone about the abortion problem in America, Andrea Mitchell slapped down Juleanna Glover – after Glover had called herself “deeply pro-life” Mitchell insisted that she call herself “anti-abortion” in order to “use the term that I think is more value-neutral.”

Half a million people marched. That’s pretty impressive. Guess how many marched in support of gun control in Washington, DC the next day?

The best guess anyone is willing to offer is “thousands.” That’s it. Nobody is willing to say for sure because the left-wing media knows full well that it won’t come close to the volume of people that showed up for the March for Life.

I, personally, am thoroughly disgusted by how biased the media is being right now.

They have made clear that they don’t give a damn about the facts. They aren’t interested in actually protecting children; they see Sandy Hook and other mass shootings as a stepping stool to complete gun control, eventually even an outright UK-style ban. They have always wanted guns to be banned. Guns are only used for killing, you see. For that reason we have no right to own them. If you ask Sylvester Stallone, he’ll tell you that “it’s not 200 years ago, we don’t need this [the Second Amendment] anymore!” Yes, he actually said that. In fact, he said it in 2008 when he endorsed John McCain for president.

I hate to tell you this, Sly, but we do need it now. We need it more than ever.

The most disgusting thing about the march for gun control yesterday were the signs that said, “We Are Sandy Hook, We Choose Love.” Really? You think that because you are against guns, you are somehow more loving than I am? Let me explain something…I love every child in my family. Every single one of my nieces and nephews is a gift from God. I love them so much that if anyone ever tried to harm them, I would kill that person with my bare hands. I would rather they see me kill a person who is trying to be violent than have to bury them. What would I say to them in the aftermath? That there are bad people in the world, and you should never choose violence, but you should always be ready to defend yourself if the need arises. Yes, I believe those children are worth far more than the animals trying to murder them. Yes, I would be willing to kill to protect them. Yes, it is because I love them. The fact that anyone would accuse me of not loving those kids is an insult that I refuse to abide.

March organizer Molly Smith said she was “horrified by it [Sandy Hook].” Do you think we weren’t? Does anyone really believe that those of us who believe in and actively exercise our Second Amendment rights weren’t absolutely tortured at the thought of what those families were going through, what those children experienced in their last moments of life? There is a word for those who do believe such nonsense: narcissists.

My little brother has picked up a gun and gone to war twice because he loved his country and his family. He didn’t want us to have to survive another 9/11. He didn’t want his wife and children to live in fear. A good friend of mine died in that war because he believed in freedom and taking the fight to the bad guy rather than cowering and begging for mercy. Other friends came home in pieces because they believed in the cause of freedom. Now you want to tell them that they can’t defend their families on their own soil, in their own homes? You want to tell them – tell ME – that we cannot be trusted with the same tool that won our freedom in the first place and has won peace many times since?

Perhaps the absolute silliest parallel drawn during the gun control march came from 78-year-old James Agenbroad. He carried a sign that read, “Repeal the 2nd Amendment.” He said, “you can repeal it. We repealed prohibition.”

I don’t think Mr. Agenbroad really understands what he’s saying here. Prohibition was an outright ban on the manufacturing, sale and transportation of alcoholic beverages. It lasted from 1920-1933. You could drink, you just couldn’t brew or distill or transport the stuff (making it a little hard to drink). Prohibition was a spectacular failure. It did absolutely nothing to stop alcohol from being produced, sold and transported – in fact, it made the trade a more lucrative business. It was Al Capone’s business.

You cannot make a point about gun control – repealing the Second Amendment and banning and confiscating all civilian-owned firearms – by invoking the repeal of a law that banned alcohol. If you don’t understand the ludicrosity of his statement, you are beyond my help.

What do you do when someone like Adam Lanza shows up with guns that the law prevented him from buying to shoot innocent people? Well, first you hide. Then you call 911 to beg for rough men and women to bring their guns to shoot him and stop his killing spree. There is nothing wrong with being afraid and wanting to hide. The problems come when you expect me to do what you’re doing. It will never happen. The fact that I see how evil people can be and am willing to stand up to them does not make me dangerous, nor does it make me different.

I’m not sure how much more I can take of these blithering nitwits declaring that “it just can’t happen again.” You keep saying that, and yet you’re setting us all up to be walking targets.

Tragedy, Made Easy

It’s hard to think about what Jovan Belcher may have been thinking early Saturday morning when he shot his girlfriend at his home (in front of his mother, no less). In the past two days he’s been described as laid-back, jovial, hard-working and dedicated. It has even been reported that while he played for the University of Maine he joined the Male Athletes Against Violence Initiative. After shooting Kasandra Perkins, though, he drove to Arrowhead Stadium for Chiefs practice – only to thank his coach and general manager for what they’d done for him and later turn the gun on himself.

As tragic as this is, people can’t simply take in the gravity and mourn what’s happened. It wasn’t even 48 hours before leftists in the media were calling for an end to the “gun culture” in America. Bob Costas spoke of the issue during halftime on the broadcast of the Cowboys/Eagles game, agreeing with a Kansas City writer that “If Jovan Belcher didn’t possess a gun, he and Kasandra Perkins would both be alive today.” Mike Lupica of the NY Daily News declared that “Murdering this young woman, 22, and then killing himself in front of his coach and his general manager was made easy by a gun, because a gun always makes it easier.” It hasn’t even been two days and too many people have pinned this on guns.

Costas quoted KC writer Jason Whitlock, who also wrote, “Our current gun culture simply ensures that more and more domestic disputes will end in the ultimate tragedy, and that more convenience-store confrontations over loud music coming from a car will leave more teenage boys bloodied and dead.” While I agree with his remarks that Roger Goodell should have cancelled Sunday’s game in KC, I could not disagree more with one of his final statements: “Handguns do not enhance our safety. They exacerbate our flaws, tempt us to escalate arguments, and bait us into embracing confrontation rather than avoiding it.”

Here again, we see the phenomenon of those in a position of high visibility using a senseless tragedy to try to push an agenda. Rather than take a deeper look at society’s problems, they are quick to blame the gun. It’s easier that way because we don’t have to look at ourselves or ask what really does need to be changed – and how we got here in the first place. Blaming the gun absolves us of having to do or say anything that really might make a few heavy-hitters remarkably uncomfortable.

Sorry, Mr. Whitlock. It’s not the “gun culture” that drives young men to pull out the gats and start spraying rival gang members with bullets. “That gun was just irresistable, it made me feel like a man!” said no murderer, ever. I’ve been a corrections officer, and I know exactly what the problem with our culture is – but you don’t want to hear it. That’s why you’re so quick to blame a culture that really doesn’t exist in your quest for an answer.

When I was a kid, rap was just coming into the mainstream. Back in the 80′s, rap wasn’t nearly as violent as it is now. It wasn’t exactly peacenik music, but rap took an extremely dark turn in the 90′s when Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls (among others) came onto the scene. Suddenly, we had a new brand of “music” (if you could call it that) that glorified gang membership, selling drugs to get rich, flaunting illegally-gotten gain and being extremely violent. It carried the objectification of women to an entirely new level, even glorifying rape. Shakur was killed in 1996, but as of last year has sold 75 million albums. The man had the words “thug life” tattooed across his abdomen. Snoop Doggy Dog has sold more than 30 million albums to date. He’s a declared member of the Crips, was in and out of prison before making it big. As a convicted felon, he’s barred by federal law from owning a handgun but has been very proud in flaunting the fact that he has guns and has been arrested on multiple weapons violations. Dr. Dre founded Death Row Records, has sold tens of millions of albums and has launched the careers of some of the biggest names in rap, including Snoop, 50 Cent, Eminem and The Game. I won’t even bother trying to quote rap lyrics because most of it would be blurred out and the editors would still need me to apologize.

Video games are also vastly different than when I was a kid. I had Pong and Frogger when I was little, followed by Super Mario Bros. and Kid Icarus as a teenager. Nowadays? We have the Grand Theft Auto series, a wildly popular game that has the player building a criminal empire from knee-breaker to high-roller – usually while getting revenge on another double-crossing bad guy. That series alone has sold 114 million copies across five versions.

Does anyone really still labor under the delusion that guns, and not pop culture itself, are to blame for the rise in violent tendencies? I started off in juvenile corrections. If they hadn’t taught us the statistics of youth involved in crime in the academy, we certainly would have learned the common denominators while walking the beat – the overwhelming majority of kids who have been adjudicated as delinquent and sentenced to real time come from single-parent homes, and those that knew both of their parents had one (usually their father) who was a convicted felon. Most of them were woefully undereducated; in fact, I lost track of how many were completely illiterate. They couldn’t have told you the difference between a noun and a verb, but they could have excused their glorification of the thug life so eloquently that they could almost make a believer out of you.

We were once a society that frowned upon having a child out of wedlock. Now we’re seeing astronomical rates of illegitimacy coupled with rapidly dwindling interest in education (and when someone tries to say, “hey, I made a mistake, don’t do what I did,” they’re derided by the press – Bristol Palin comes to mind). Whereas education was once important to America, we’re now at the bottom of the global pile and we’re trying to defend the educational system that has been an abysmal failure since my childhood. We have so-called experts telling teachers not to grade with red ink and teachers who don’t believe in homework or giving a student a failing grade because it’s too negative – then we expect these ill-prepared children who have no idea how to grow up to go out into the world and make something of themselves. All of this while they listen to violent music, play violent games, and glorify the lives of hardened criminals who get featured on VH1 for writing music while in prison. Discipline has all but gone the way of the dinosaur as liberals have managed to blur the lines between discipline and abuse. All of this in the name of self-expression – a purely emotional concept that teaches extremes that children should be learning to control, not vent.

I don’t believe for an instant that Jovan Belcher was violent. I think he may have had head injuries common to NFL players that contributed to his tragic end. Let’s not kid ourselves, though – all of these people now claiming that the ease with which he obtained his gun and the supposed gun-loving culture we live in made this happen are deluding themselves. Rather than look inward to see what we could change, they’d rather find another culprit so they don’t have to question all of their other beliefs about life and society. It’s unfair to the families of Belcher and Perkins to shift that blame. It’s tragic for future generations that we’re not willing to be honest.